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Byron Shire Environmental Mapping

The mapping presented here is based on Councils 2007 vegetation maps.

Council is in the process of reviewing mapping over the entire Shire in 3 Stages. The first stage of the updated mapping for the coastal areas, and the second stage for hinterland areas were exhibited in 2015. The work is currently under review based on 2015 high resolution imaging.

The updated vegetation mapping will guide conservation land management programs, future planning instruments and land uses, including, Council’s Rural Land Use Strategy .

Council has a range of environmental mapping which is used to identify areas of environmental value for planning and conservation purposes. This mapping has been produced by Council through the Flora and Fauna Study 1999, the Biodiversity Conservation Strategy 2004 and subsequent reviews, as well as mapping data provided by organisations such as National Parks and Wildlife Service (now Office of Environment and Heritage) and Department of Primary Industries.

The maps provide a resource that can be used when preparing development applications to see what environmental values are present on a property. When a property contains High Conservation Value vegetation or other values an assessment will likely be required to determine if any negative impacts will occur as a result of the development.

Two separate interactive PDF maps are available for download:

Vegetation mapping 
This displays Vegetation Association mapping throughout the Shire.

Environmental values mapping
This map includes the following layers: High Conservation Value vegetation, Wildlife Corridors, Koala habitat, Key Fish Habitat, Eco-wetlands and Threatened fauna habitat.

Using the maps
The Environmental Values map contains a series of layers which you can turn on and off in order to view one or more layers at a time.

To display the layers, click on either the   or  symbol on the left hand column of the pdf. This will expand the column to display the different layers. You can then turn layers on by double clicking the desired layer and turn them off by clicking on the  symbol.

You can also zoom in to see property scale detail by right clicking and selecting Marquee zoom. Selecting the Hand tool allows you to navigate around the map.

Disclaimer
Mapping environmental features and values has limitations due to unavoidable inaccuracies in source information and changes on the ground that has occurred since the data was compiled. While all reasonable care has been taken to ensure the information contained on these maps is up to date and accurate, no warranty is given that the information contained on this map is free from error or omission. Council actively continues to collect information to assist with updating mapping were inaccuracies are identified.

VEGETATION
Vegetation mapping was last updated in 2007 using digital aerial photography of the Shire from June 2004 (at 1:25,000 scale), 2002 aerial photography of Tallow Creek Catchment (at 1:8,000 scale) and 2004 digital aerial photography of Belongil Creek Catchments (at 1:4,000 scale). Vegetation mapping was initially carried out in 1999 based on aerial photograph from 1991 as part of the Byron Flora and Fauna Survey however this mapping has been superseded by the 2007 mapping.

HCV – High Conservation Value vegetation
High conservation value vegetation is the name given to areas of land identified as containing important environmental values. These areas are calculated and mapped using a methodology adopted in Council’s Byron Biodiversity Conservation Strategy (2004). Further detail on HCV is provided in the fact sheet High Conservation Value Land in Byron Shire.

WILDLIFE CORRIDORS
Wildlife corridors have been developed to identify important links across the landscape to encourage the movement of flora and fauna species. Byron shire wildlife corridors were developed as part of the Byron Biodiversity Conservation Strategy and are based on wildlife corridor mapping produced by National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS). The NPWS mapping was refined by ecologists and botanists involved in the production of the Biodiversity Conservation Strategy based on detailed knowledge of the Byron shire landscape and the ecology of local fauna and flora species.

KOALA HABITAT
Koala habitat mapping is divided into 4 sub-categories based on their potential for supporting koala populations. The koala habitat mapping was based on 2007 vegetation mapping using methodology developed by the Australia Koala Foundation. The mapping uses the overstorey tree species to determine the quality of habitat for koalas.

Primary Habitat: This habitat is capable of supporting high-density koala populations.

  • Areas of forest or woodland where primary koala food tree species comprise at least 50% of the overstorey trees.

Secondary habitat (Class A): This habitat category is capable of supporting high to medium-density koala populations.

  • Areas of forest or woodland where primary koala food tree species comprise less than 50% but at least 30% of the overstorey trees; or
  • Areas of forest or woodland where primary koala food tree species comprise less than 30% of the overstorey trees, but together with secondary food tree species comprise at least 50% of the overstorey trees; or
  • Areas of forest or woodland where secondary food tree species alone comprise at least 50% of the overstorey trees (primary koala food tree species absent).

Secondary Habitat (Class B): This habitat category is capable of supporting medium to low-density koala populations.

  • Areas of forest or woodland where primary koala food tree species comprise less than 30% of the overstorey trees; or
  • Areas of forest or woodland where primary koala food tree species together with secondary food tree species comprise at least 30% (but less than 50%) of the overstorey trees; or 
  • Areas of forest or woodland where secondary food tree species alone comprise at least 30% (but less than 50%) of the overstorey trees (primary koala food tree species absent).

Secondary habitat (Class C): This habitat type is capable of supporting low-density koala populations

  • Areas of forest or woodland where koala habitat is comprised of secondary and supplementary food tree species (primary koala food tree species absent except for possible scattered individual trees), where secondary food tree species comprise less than 30% of the overstorey trees.

Tertiary habitat: Not capable of supporting koala populations in the absence of Primary or Secondary Habitat.

  • Areas of forest or woodland where primary and secondary koala food tree species are absent, but which have important supplementary koala habitat values such as habitat buffers and habitat linking areas.  Such areas are considered to be necessary components of habitat for the overall conservation of koala populations.

KEY FISH HABITAT
Key fish habitat mapping was developed in 2007 by the Department of Primary Industries across the state. Key Fish Habitats are those aquatic habitats that are important to the sustainability of the recreational and commercial fishing industries, the maintenance of fish populations and the survival and recovery of threatened aquatic species. Key Fish Habitat includes all marine and estuarine habitats up to highest astronomical tide level (that reached by 'king' tides) and most permanent and semi-permanent freshwater habitats including rivers, creeks, lakes, lagoons, billabongs, weir pools and impoundments up to the top of the bank.

THREATENED FAUNA HABITAT
Threatened Fauna Habitat mapping displays areas of vegetation that provide habitat or potential habitat for key threatened fauna species. This map layer is based on Key Fauna Habitat modelling undertaken by National Parks and Wildlife Service. The map layer displays areas of vegetation with their centre located in modelled fauna habitat for select key threatened fauna species known from the Shire.

ECO WETLAND
Eco wetlands include areas identified in State Environmental Planning Policy No. 14 - Coastal Wetlands (SEPP14) as well as other important wetland areas including mangroves, saltmarsh, swamps, lagoons, estuaries and floodplain complex forest.